Sunday, March 29, 2020

BREATHE DEEP | Virtual Art

As we practice social distancing, all of us who remain healthy can help ourselves and others by taking a moment to breathe deep and appreciate the love and joy we share, if remotely. Toward that end, we’re scheduling posts that uplift, guide, and unite us in these difficult times.

From the comfort of your living room, enjoy great art from around the world: Excerpts from an article by Sebastian Smee in the Washington Post:
"Almost every U.S. art museum, big or small, has a website. Many of them are not only beautifully presented but also fantastic resources. Some offer virtual guided tours. Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum even has a walk-through with its director of security, Anthony Amore, retracing the path taken by the thieves who broke into the museum on March 18, 1990.
In a more idle frame of mind, you can also browse your favorite museum’s permanent collection — and get a sense of the 90 to 95 percent of works not on display at any given time. Just type in the name of your favorite artist, or category of art, and press search.
Major museum websites also present expert audio about highlights of their collections. The Met produces short videos of contemporary artists talking about their favorite works. It’s a wonderful series. And all of this is just for starters.
But of course, the possibilities go way beyond the websites of art museums. If you want to learn a little — or a lot — about art, the Khan Academy and Smarthistory have terrific short videos about major artworks and bigger topics within art history. Either dip in and out according to your own whim or take a carefully curated course. You could lose yourself in these for months, if not years. It’s all easily available online and free.
Google Arts and Culture, which has its own app, is similarly impressive. You can take virtual tours of the world’s greatest museums and get insanely close up to some of the world’s most famous paintings."

Saturday, March 28, 2020

BREATHE DEEP | Visit History

As we practice social distancing, all of us who remain healthy can help ourselves and others by taking a moment to breathe deep and appreciate the love and joy we share, if remotely. Toward that end, we’re scheduling posts that uplift, guide, and unite us in these difficult times.

The Washington Post shares these twelve historic sites you can visit from the comfort of your home.


Friday, March 27, 2020

BREATHE DEEP | Live-Streaming

As we practice social distancing, all of us who remain healthy can help ourselves and others by taking a moment to breathe deep and appreciate the love and joy we share, if remotely. Toward that end, we’re scheduling posts that uplift, guide, and unite us in these difficult times.

From the Washington Post, this on the power of live-streamed music: 

"On Saturday morning, a familiar sound filled the stale semi-silence of my new work-from-home reality: my friend and fellow reporter Miguel Ot├írola spinning records on a shaky live stream from his Minneapolis apartment. Like D.C., the Twin Cities are shutting down. We’re all cooped up, maybe working too much. We’re self-isolated, and we feel that way, too. Enter music. Miguel is spending his outbreak downtime DJing and making music — live, online, in Mister Rogers sweaters, bringing the Internet archipelago of his friends together under a single soundtrack. He played an eclectic set Saturday, but the message was the same no matter what was on: You’re not alone. Music calms us, transports us. Miguel says, “It can bring in light, open up a room, give you energy.” And we could all use that. This is probably happening in your corner of social media, too, as more artists and tinkerers turn to live-streaming to keep the music spreading." — Reis Thebault


ACTION: CORONAVIRUS RELIEF BILL NEEDS MORE WORK

Thursday, March 26, 2020

BREATHE DEEP | Not All Heroes Wear Capes

As we practice social distancing, all of us who remain healthy can help ourselves and others by taking a moment to breathe deep and appreciate the love and joy we share, if remotely. Toward that end, we’re scheduling posts that uplift, guide, and unite us in these difficult times.

From the Washington Post, this reminder to appreciate those whose work often goes unrecognized: 

"A three-tweet thread from Jester D (@JustMeTurtle) Saturday roughly did for me what watching five seasons of “The Wire” did: Remind me that every job, no matter how routine or insignificant it can feel, is essential for a functioning society. Doing it well, free of cut corners, matters. Jester wrote about being a garbageman who can’t work from home, and it resonated with others who aren’t taking days off because the world needs us. We’ve always been needed, but suddenly we felt a little more seen and appreciated. Twitter, which is often ground zero for awfulness, unspooled a thread of appreciation for the garbage collectors, delivery people, bus drivers, janitors, mailmen and so many others who, as it turns out, aren’t taken for granted. Users gave Jester more than 452,000 likes and reminders that “not all heroes wear capes.” His dose of unadulterated “we’ll get through this together” positivity stood out." — Keith McMillan